Africa

The Rise of an Empire: Cinco De Money 2

When we speak of legends, from the Hip Hop perspective, we must all agree that each city has its own acclaimed Hall of Fame. Well, because I’m from Chicago, allow me to expose you to one phenomenal emcee from our global city here in the Midwest region of the United States. This is going to be a bit unorthodox for you traditional suckas, but we’re going to give a big up to one of our own while he can still smell the flowers. I’m sure, after seeing the manifestation of his supporters, that he understands the love that the city has for him, but I believe it’s time to knock down the barriers on communication. Ty Money actually gave the recipe in one of the songs I’m about to review when he said, “we’ve been sleeping for 400 years straight; think it’s time to wake please…” So with that said, lets show Ty Money what we are going to take from his highly anticipated and demanded mixtape, Cinco De Money 2.

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Before we dive right into this piece, it’s important to understand the history behind this amazing artist. Ty Money actually represents Harvey World, but I personally don’t agree with the geographical divides that came into place because of the hyper-gentrification of Chicago’s public housing communities. Harvey, Illinois is a part of Chicago, and we definitely are going to finesse those boundaries to be able to claim this amazing brother as our own. This artist has most certainly earned his keep, and has labored to gain his position as one of the city’s most prospective and creatively explosive artists, period. Money and his brother I.D. joined together in 2005 to form the power rap group, Firesquad. Fast forward to Summer of 2015 when he dropped Cinco De Money vol. 1, where he brands his unique and particular sound that launches him into the platform of next guy up for the entire Midwest region. After spending time with Yassin Bey (Formerly known as Mos Def), and dropping the extremely conscious track United Center afterward, I was very curious to know whether Ty Money would spill some of the heightened black awareness into his music, and I must say that I am not dissatisfied; this album was monumental, and I believe it contains a healthy balance of the positive and negatives that come with being from the hood. Being a revolutionary writer, and an activist, I have a very low filter for fuck music, and I have a strong dislike for the content that makes up the Chicago Drill scene. I was happy to hear story lines, artistry, mixtures in creative content; all of the differences that made albums of the 90’s so classic.

            I decided to review 3 songs from his project, and instead of just adding fancy words to describe what I want you to believe the song is about, I’m going to break down exactly what he is saying, then put it into perspective so it can be used to understand the choices that are children are poised with on a daily basis. The first song, and be advised that this order bears not merit to my ordering on the quality of each song, is God got Us, which was produced by Y. F. Beatz. The second song that I’m going to review is What They Taught Me, which was produced by RioMac. Lastly, I’ll provide a review of How, which was also produced by RioMac.

In God Got Us, which features a deep hypnotic bass line, with a simple chord, and the artist compliments with calmly energetic rhyme scheme that befits what the intro to a mixtape is supposed to sound like. The lesson to be learned from this song is that we all need to do some individual prioritizing; in all this work towards perfection, we must never forget to keep faith, and also acknowledge God for bringing us through all of the trials and tribulations that we have encountered. Ty Money starts the song off by dropping the greatest jewel so far this year by saying, “Get some money, f*** the hype n****. Walk by faith, not by sight n****. Flexing around the wolves, that’s not right n****…” This brings us to the place where we begin to ask about the moral fabric of these deviant citizens, who live by street laws, as opposed to state mandated laws. The question being whether religion has a sufficient effect on curbing violence and plight in minority communities here in the United States, or whether a more effective institution of socialization is needed.

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Institutions of Socialization

Whether or not churches have the ability to curb violence in the community, it is apparent that these urban deviants do still hold sound beliefs in God, but reject the authority or persuasion of the church. Not to stray too far from the subject, but that is a reality in these communities that have been affected by violence, that is manifest derivative of economic and social disparity that is prevalent in minority communities. This brings us to the question of how we develop and diffuse the sets of morals that will bring about the behaviors that we hope to see in the future leaders of our people. With all of the violence that is associated with our youth, Money validates this generational attraction to mischief, and how experience and maturity help to curve these behaviors when he spits, “I den been to jail, came home, got shot, caught a cause, so now I do a lot of cooling…” The question that I propose after here this testimony is how do we encourage young minority men to see the benefits of developing habits that help to decrease the probability of them ending up in troublesome situations and dangerous environments.

Further expounding on the some of the moral sets that are popular in the urban music community here in Chicago, Ty Money captivates us with his single worthy track, What They Taught Me, which is spread evenly over a mellow and smoke ready melody. The key lesson behind this track is honor, and in the song, Ty exposes several of the key guidelines and laws that are stressed to young minority men in urban communities here in the U.S. In the hook he raps, “Get money, fuck b*****s, tote itchy, pour liquor, little n**** don’t back from no n****. That’s just what they taught me…” In this segment of the track, we can identify urban hustle in his reference to getting money, which establishes urban hustling as an important trait in minority communities.

Black Men Fighting For Honor

He also references the trait of honor, by proclaiming that he wouldn’t back down from anyone, regardless of who they were. This isn’t an isolated characteristic, and might provide a glimpse into misconceptions with our youth around the definition of honor; a misconception that may contribute to situations that account for a portion of our city’s high crime rate. And like many Hip Hop songs in circulation, there are references to sex and alcohol, tools that urban deviants use to numb the stress caused by social factors associated with poverty stricken communities. This is a testament to the desensitization of sex by promiscuous sexual saturation on mainstream media outlets, especially including the music and film industries. Unlike critics of the promiscuous nature of the music industry, I do not place sole blame for this desensitization of sex on these male entertainers, but I blame institutions of socialization, and also the women who, without their participation, could make the fad of casual sex disappear.

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Money also takes this song into a deeper community analysis when he expounds his verse on the perspectives of simple-minded individuals made smoking, eating and having sex a priority. He also expounds on his skepticism and distrust, that was taught to him by his mother (nurture-socialization), that serves as a defense mechanism or mechanism of survival for these underserved minority citizens. Things me to an experience of my own, where I went to Seattle, and experienced culture shock. It wasn’t a situation where I was thrown into a pack of wolves and torn apart. On the contrary, I was brought from a place where distrust kept you alive, to a place where every said hi and openly solicited their friendship. This was a great observation presented by Ty, but even more impressive was his take on the advice given by leaders and elders from his community. In this story, he tells of the advice by elders to not live life so fast and loud, and that by staying discrete about his ventures, he would set himself for more long-term successes. In this line, he also exposes a latent benefit to living a more discrete lifestyle; making himself less of a target for predators in the community. According to Money, they also instilled in him the requirement to assess the productivity of individuals that he places in his network, because inefficient relationships become more of a liability then a benefit. Ok, we have established the depth of his perspectives on priorities and moral sets, but how critical is Ty on his own culture, from the perspective of objective introspection?

Well Accomplished  

Well, from my opinion, Ty Money did not just do this, but he did it in the boldest and most eloquent manner, by posing critical thought provoking questions for consumers to ponder on. The thesis for this song, as I perceive it is actually a statement prompting peers in his culture to objectively assess themselves. In this proposition, he exposes his perception that young minorities have become complacent, and have failed to set goals in the culture that promote long term success for the culture, as well as the entire race of people of African descent here in the United States. Money begins his proposal by asking, “How you at the mall, pocket full of swipes: baby out of wipes? Card cracker turned rapper; caught a fraud case, now you wanna write.” Can you see the profoundness of this questioning? Money has set the bar for critical thinking, and the application of logical thought when assessing one’s self in the pursuit of personal progress. He also questions the increasingly dominant trend of individuals seeking to capitalize in the music industry off of the credit of having criminal backgrounds and involvement.

PTSD

I personally see this trend as being a product of post traumatic slavery disorder, paired with the continuous neglect by African Americans to unify beyond imposed class divides, to address the effects caused by the instability of African American households; a direct derivative of the institutional plights that have been inflicted upon our race by white america. Most important to this subject, is the evident internalization of norms by African Americans; norms that were created by racist and imperialist white america. The fact that I have been able to dive so in depth into the content within this song, and I haven’t gone pass the first 4 bars in the song, is the reason why you must download this mixtape in the link provided below, and give this project (especially this song) a try! This song is really the manifestation of what I wanted to see from Ty Money after his time building with Yassin Bey; a song dedicated to the advance of the critical thought of young minorities in america. Go download that project now dammit. Geno signing off, but never offline; enjoy!

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Facebook Profile: https://www.facebook.com/tiwan.dirtybirds?fref=ts

Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Ty-Money-172494749451707/?fref=ts

Twitter Profile: https://twitter.com/TyMoneySBMG

Instagram Profile: https://www.instagram.com/tymoneysbmg/

SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/tiwan-tymoney-sbmg-dirtybirds

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/ty-money/id303280162

Google Play:
They Aint Doin Shyt (Remix) ft. Mac Mili – https://play.google.com/music/preview/Agnyqoxxotwtpormt63ourabvmi?u=0#

Reader Article: http://www.chicagoreader.com/chicago/ty-money-tiwan-raybon-cinco-mixtape-rap-hip-hop-harvey/Content?oid=21007766

Live Mixtapes:
Cinco De Money vol. 1: http://indy.livemixtapes.com/mixtapes/34051/ty-money-cinco-de-money.html
Cinco De Money vol. 2: http://indy.livemixtapes.com/mixtapes/39565/ty-money-cinco-de-money-2.html

Ty Money – Billboard.com – United Center: http://www.billboard.com/articles/columns/hip-hop/6777151/ty-money-laquan-mcdonald-murder-united-center-video

RioMac Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RioMacHSP?ref=br_rs

Y.F. Beats SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/yfbeats-1

 

 

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