#HeToo: A True Story

The Facts & Statistics

I’d like to personally give a special shout to the #MeToo movement for giving women who’ve been victims of sexual assault as well as sexual harassment a platform to be vulnerable. It has given an insurmountable amount of support to women who have been abused and mistreated by men in their lives, most times by those who are the closest in proximity.

Before we go any further let’s have a firm understanding of what the difference is between sexual assault and sexual harassment:  According to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), sexual harassment is “unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical harassment of a sexual nature.” [2] The emphasis here seems to be on the verbal nature of the harassment; whereas the U.S. Justice Department defines sexual assault as being less verbal and more physical: “. . . any type of sexual contact or behavior that occurs without the explicit consent of the recipient. Falling under the definition of sexual assault are sexual activities as forced sexual intercourse, forcible sodomy, child molestation, incest, fondling, and attempted rape.”

But what of the men who have been sexually abused or harassed? Are there any studies on this subject? Why or why not?

My search extensive search has lead me to the following statistics:

  • 3 out of 5 women will have been sexually harassed in their lifetime
  • 1 out of 5 men will be sexually harassed in their lifetime
  • According to the EOCC 80% of people, regardless of gender, never file a harassment complaint

A large reason for this are the feelings of shame, betrayal, embarrassment and perhaps even backlash from the immediate community. Most individuals feel like no one will believe their story so that’s why they don’t come forward. The person that took advantage of them may be a person of great influence or power. And let’s not mention the legal issues that could stem from making such a claim against a person.

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A recent online survey  provided by Stop Street Harassment illustrates that 3 out of 4 women are verbally harassed compared to 1 out of 3 men.

Inspiration

My inspiration to write this piece came from two men in particular that gave me the courage to come forward. Months ago on my #StrengthInNumbersPodcast I expressed my thoughts of Terry Crews’ run in with Adam Venit. Long story short Terry Crews had his genitals publicly groped at a party in Hollywood for everyone to see, you can watch his interview here:

 

 

 

Keep in mind that this was all done in front of his wife and the part that bothered me the most is that his assaulter was laughing. The audacity!!! As I listened to his story I was reminded of the slavery stories of buck breaking. Buck breaking is a process by which a slave master would emasculate their slaves in order to have control over the slave family. After the slave was beaten, he was often times raped in front of his wife and kids.

What stood out for me most about his interview is that he would not be ashamed of what happened to him, and the truth of the matter is that no one should.

My next source of inspiration is from a Breakfast Club interview I watched featuring Broward County’s VERY own, Denzel Curry. His new album TA1300 (Taboo) is exactly just that, it speaks on taboo subjects ranging from molestation to drug abuse. He then went on to say that he had been molested by a man as a child.

 

 

 

 

As I was watching the interview I recognized an all too familiar pain on his face that was similar to mine. I empathize with and commend that young man for being brave enough to share his story despite the pain it carried with it. You’re indeed stronger than most!

 

Personal Experiences

The Slumber Party

My first sexual experience was at the tender age of 5.

It was one of those weekends where my father picked me up, but before we went home he just so happened to make an extra stop to pick up one of his girlfriends, her daughter and her infant son. I suppose they figured it was a good idea since her and I were around the same age but I believe she was younger than me.

I can vividly remember my dad and his girlfriend of the that night being in a hurry for us to go to bed, for obvious reasons. Her son was put to sleep on the couch while her daughter and I slept on the living room floor, it was a slumber party of sorts. The light was turned off so that we could fall to sleep and they disappeared into his room.

While I was resting I could feel something on my body, moving around. I could feel that I was being caressed up and down my body, mainly my chest and stomach.

A burning sensation rushed through my entire body.

“What feeling is this?”

“Why am I feeling like this?”

It eventually traveled down to my genitals and I woke up to my slumber partner fondling my member. When I looked in her eyes they were bright and inviting; I don’t think this was done to be malicious but it definitely made me uncomfortable.

Uncomfortable to the point where I forcefully moved her hand away. It was uncomfortable to where it was physically tender for a couple of hours after.

Looking back on those events I strongly believe that she had witnessed her mom in a sexual act or that someone had sexually molested her. How else would she know what to do at such a young age? This being my first sexual encounter ever, it should be understood that I was thoroughly confused. I’m not even sure what this can be categorized as in today’s terms.


 

Capture

The Met

I remember vividly joining Metropolitan Community Church in 2001. My mom and I had just recently migrated from Quinn Chapel to this new institution that my godfather had transitioned to play the organ. When we finally did join the congregation greeted us with opened arms and we assimilated almost seamlessly into the population.

I think one of the greatest selling points that led us to join was the fact that there was a young population that I could assimilate into as well. Shortly after we joined the church I joined the Junior Usher board and made friends with everyone. I was basically the one kid everyone in the church used to sing praises about highlighting how handsome and respectful I was towards adults.

This is more than likely the time I started being observed by administration, more specifically the head minister of the church. Over the years of being involved in the church I began to look at the pastor as a father figure, an uncle or a big brother. So I divulged in extremely personal information that I feel like I couldn’t share with my family. I don’t have a close relationship with my biological dad, my stepfather and I had always been on bad terms since I began to develop as a man. There aren’t many men in my family and the ones that are I felt wouldn’t do shit anyway, in all honesty.

Our relationship had gotten so close that one year I even wrote a Fathers’ Day speech and presented it to the congregation. It described how much I appreciated him as a positive male role model in my life and the amount of trust I had in him.

Perhaps he saw this as a signal that I wanted to be sexually active with him.

It was during this time that I was attending South Suburban College and most times I would frequent Calumet City Public Library. It was there that I met Pierre.

Now this is not the first time I had seen Pierre, I had seen him in the ‘hood on numerous occasions but our paths never crossed. He was two to three years older than me anyway so why we bump into each other in the first place.

Anyway while I was studying for my exams I noticed Pierre studying the Bible. Our first conversation was about how he was slowly but surely turning his life around and how he was a junior pastor at a local institution in Calumet City. We both held out churches in high regard and invited each other to attend service.

The day after Pierre attended service he told me, emphatically and without a shadow of a doubt, that the head pastor was hiding something. He was so sure that he told me and whoever else I knew to stop attending.

Unfortunately, or fortunately that wasn’t the case, I suppose it depends on your perspective.

On my eighteenth and nineteenth birthday he had even taken me out for dinner. I thought absolutely nothing of it because my godfather had even treated me out for dinner on numerous occasions in the past.


 

One night, a couple of weeks after my 19th birthday I came home at about 11 o’clock at night. Shortly after I came home the phone rang, which was definitely out of the ordinary. When I saw that it was my pastor, I immediately picked up the phone but in the back of my mind I did feel as if it was a weird time for him to be calling home. Now that I think about it I’m pretty certain that he had watched me come in the door that night. He told me to come outside and I obliged.

As soon as I entered the car I smelled the strong scent of alcohol all throughout the vehicle but I pretended as if I hadn’t caught my attention. We greeted each other as usual and he asked me,

“Are you ready?”

I responded, “Ready for what?”

That’s when a large, unsettling, Chesire cat-esque appeared on his face.

He said, “Are you ready to go to this WILD party?”

Eventually I agreed and we were on our way. We drove west on 159th and anybody who’s familiar with the south suburbs knows how far 159th goes traveling west. For some reason I thought that we were going to a strip club to have “our talk”. I asked him exactly where we were going but he wouldn’t give me a concise answer.

“Damn maybe Pierre was right, this is probably what he was talking about”, I thought.

We eventually entered a residential neighborhood in Orland Park where he currently resides. The neighborhood was exactly the type of neighborhood you would expect a pastor to live in, it was very nice and each mini mansion had a great amount of yard space. When we enter the residence he tells me how much of a privilege it is to have a personal tour of his house. He goes to the fridge, pulled out some vodka in a fancy bottle and asked, “Ice or no ice?”

“No ice.”, I replied.

I hardly took any sips of that liquor because it definitely could’ve been spiked with something, anything.

Next he went to his humidor and asked if I knew how to prep a cigar, my response was no. He told me the way to prep a cigar in the same way “a girl would suck the tip of your dick.”

I laughed an uncomfortable laugh. In my eyes he was completely inappropriate but I was actually nervous as I had ever been in my life. He was completely out of pocket and I didn’t know what his plans were so I kept my composure.

“Are you ready?”

“Ready for what?”

“This talk…..”

We entered his garage which was filled with candles already lit, there had to be more that ten at the very least! There was a small table to set down our drinks with an ashtray for our cigars, two chairs were on either side of the table.

“Am I walkin’ into a séance or what the fuck is this?!”, I thought to myself.

We sit down and begin our conversation as normal but I could tell that he wanted to talk about the topic of sex for some odd reason. I made it crystal clear….

So I tell him, “I’m not a homophobe but I’m not gay.”

“Would you ever let another man suck your dick?”

“Hell NAW!!”

“You said that like I was offering.”

“Are you?!?!”, he didn’t reply but he gave me a look, the same exact look that he gave me when I first entered the car.

Keep in mind that this is the same pastor who had come to my prom send-off and had actually told me to “wrap it up”.

I asked him if he has ever done anything sexual with another man and he tells me that he had in college. By this time, I was beyond ready to go but I kept cool, in all honesty I didn’t know what he was willing to do.

I guess he figured that I was done with the conversation but he’s too intoxicated to drive so I had to. As I’m driving back to Calumet City he motioned as if he was going to touch me, each time he did I jerked the car left to right. This was coupled with him saying, in a creepy manner, “nobody wants to suck your lil dick anyway.” I guess this was his way of using reverse psychology to see my penis.

I mean he really pulled out all of the tricks that were in his hat which means they must’ve worked in his favor before.


 

The Confrontation

I hadn’t told my parents about what I experience that night for a solid year. So many thoughts ran through my mind and it forced me to look at myself under a microscope. Had I given him some signal to let him know that I was interested in that way? Why did God allow that man to be “of the cloth”? Who could I tell that could actually do something? What would the police do with the information when there was no concrete evidence? What would my church family do or say? How would the usher board react to these allegations?

I eventually told my mom and step dad about the encounter, she was clearly empathetic but my stepdad was actually tickled by the situation. I found that extremely weird, especially for him. Nonetheless a meeting with the pastor was scheduled.

I explained in graphic detail as I did above about the series of events that took place. Instead of admitting his wrong doing he deflected; claiming that I took his words out of context and went on to insult my intelligence. Next he told my parents that I had gotten someone pregnant, which was true, but he used it as a way to misdirect from his gross misconduct. I later found out that she actually had an abortion.

I genuinely expected him to get his ass beat right then and there but we left peacefully. As soon as we got in the car my mom said that we would never be attending that church again.


 

Reflection

“Fuck God, he can’t be real if he’s lettin’ motherfuckas like that lead congregations!?!”

“Why is God lettin’ predators like this live?”

This was my thought processes from age 19 to about 23, 24. I was actually fixated on what had happened to me. It made me ENRAGED that I was taken advantage of, I felt like a damn dummy. I actually missed seeing all of the inviting smiles when I walked into the sanctuary but most of all I missed the connection I had with the friends I made on the Junior Usher Board.

I was at a very dark time in my life where I began to question everything, in fact, this experience turned me away from God. I had become atheist, then agnostic and now at 31 years of age I KNOW that I am spiritual everlasting being.

I AM God and God is in me!

We have to take into consideration the difference between God and humans. Unfortunately we, often times, place celebrities, singers, police officers, actors and members of the clergy on a higher moral pedestal when we shouldn’t. Most ministers claim to be prophets or Gods’ messenger when in reality they have ulterior motives. These are harsh realities that the Black Church has disregarded, which is why young people don’t put their faith in it. But more specifically the Black community has disregarded the claims and it must stop in order to save black boys and girls.

Black people, specifically millennials, are leaving the churches and ideologies of our slavemasters because the church isn’t edifying the congregation. In other words, the churches are claiming to provide a service in exchange for loyalty. The unfortunate reality is that most churches are in the business of making money and keeping that money close to the organization.

Some possible solutions to curb America’s rape culture would be to create safe spaces for individuals that have been sexually abused, either physically or mentally, and allow them to express themselves without being judged. Another practical answer would be to increase the penalties for such offenses.


 

Major Takeaways to Think About

  • individuals as early as the age of 4 can be sexually aware/active
  • the rate at which sexual harassment is reported in America is as slow as 2%
  • men, black men go through sexual abuse as well but if victims are only reporting at 2% then imagine how many black men have been taken advantage of
  • black men don’t like to talk about their feelings because “that’s what women do”, men who express their feelings are stigmatized as weak or less than a man
  • men and women get sexually harassed at nearly the same rate according to age as illustrated by the graph below

sexual

 

The Mother of Them All

Mother’s Day is a day where you’re supposed to give your mom gifts and let her know how much you value her for having you. It’s a joyous occasion filled with fun, laughter and a trip to go see Avengers Infinity Wars. But for some mother’s who’ve had their children taken by DCFS, it was a sad, depressing and mournful day.

Imagine that you’re a hardworking mother and you’ve just had a long day on the job. Your relief for the day is usually waiting on your kids to see how their day went and how much homework they have to do. It’s about 5 minutes after the time that they usually arrive so its nothing to worry about. Then 20 minutes pass, then 45. The phone rings and it’s Tiara Long, DCP Investigator, who tells you when/how you may be able to win your kids back.

Imagine that 7 months go by and you don’t have custody of your kids on Mother’s Day.

This is the story of Alexandrea Navedo.


 

Quintin Martins: Just give me a brief overview in a brief overview of your story. Why do you feel like the system has wronged you?

A. Navedo: My name is A. Navedo and I’ve been a long time organizer in this city for about 10 years. I started actually with The Audy Home Campaign and its funny because as I was going through this court case I was fighting the same people who worked for the Audy Home. Mothers who fight for their children have to do so through the Juvenile Temporary Detention Center, and I kind of found it funny that that was the same institution that we organized against with Generation Y and F.L.Y. We were demanding more humane conditions for the children. Back then the children had dirty underwear they had to wear the same clothes for a long time so they weren’t going to school. So I was out there at the age old eighteen years old not knowing that I was going to have to fight for my kids. At eighteen nineteen I was protesting an institution that takes our children. I call this institution a “kid stealer”. Because if they’re not stealing your child through DCFS they’re incarcerating your child. A lot of children in the Audy Home are DCFS children and nobody wants to foster them because they’re a little  troubled and have nowhere to go. They’ll stay there until someone takes them in.

I feel like the justice system did me wrong because they didn’t do a proper investigation. They didn’t take my children from my home like they do some mothers. They actually took my children from the school and they only went off of what my first child said not my other children. And they didn’t go off of what the teacher said either. If they would’ve done a full investigation they would’ve learned that my twelve year old has some behavior issues. But of course that didn’t matter. The things that I’ve been through in my life has caused me to have some issues as well. I do suffer from anxiety, I do suffer from depression, but what I hate is that they try to lump us in this one group as if we’re incapable of raising our children. So if you wonder why a lot of women who are being domestically abused don’t seek help is because once DCFS gets involved we have a really really really big chance of losing our kids. We call the police and think we’re calling for help then DCFS gets involved and now they want to screen you; send you to this psychiatrist that psychiatrist and say,  “Hey you must have a problem because this man was beating you.” A lot of times the kids are placed with the father who was probably the abuser so its kind of like, a crazy situation. In my situation there are things that weren’t done that I later came to find out should’ve been.

QM: So whats the proper protocol that they were supposed to do as far as interrogating your kids, and taking them into the system?

AN: Ok, well one thing they didn’t do was C-RAP my home. So C-RAP is when they come into your home and look at your home to see if there’s adequate living conditions. Another thing they do is ask the school if they think that somethings going on. They never did any of those things. Why hasn’t the school called if there felt like there was a problem? Another thing that they failed to do was interview my other two children. I have three children but unfortunately they didn’t follow up with the other two. So DCFS comes into the school and they tell your children if your mom is whoopin you or hitting you, if your moms not feeding you we have a better place for you to go to. Or if your mom is putting you on punishment; they even say if your mom is yelling at you then they can’t do that, that’s child abuse. You can call us, we’ll come lock up your parents up and take you away to a better place. And that’s kind of crazy because you might have some kids that get mad at their parents, you know, in my instance, in my case. I have a daughter, and unfortunately she stole some money from my mother, her grandmother. So my mom put her on punishment and my child started talking about doing things to herself. I take her to the hospital, they tell me that for further evaluation I have to take her to Hartgrove. We came home, went to sleep, and I sent her to school the next day because I had a job interview. I go to my job interview, come back home and I’m waiting for my kids to get back home. They never came back home. About forty five minutes later I get a call from DCP Investigator, Tiara Long. She’s like, “I have your kids and I’m going to call you back in two days to tell you whats going on with your kids” and I’m like, “Why do you have my kids? My kids have not one scar on them, no bruises on them and I’m sure they’re telling you I’m not putting my hands on them.” Even my son and my youngest are telling DCFS they don’t feel safe in the new environment that they’re in. Even yesterday when I went to go see them they’re like, “Ma, I’m telling DCFS that I don’t wanna be where I’m at, I don’t feel safe where I’m at and that I wanna go back home with you.” They took them to the doctor and they still managed to take my kids into the system.

QM: And to be specific what was the reasoning for them to take your kids? You said that your daughter said something?

AN: Yes, so my oldest child got put on punishment and got mad and said some things that would get her to grandma’s house. She wanted to go to grannys house because there’s less rules and I can do whatever I want to do there. My case isn’t the only case like that, there’s a lot of cases that are based on allegations. It may be a neighbor with false allegations or a child with false allegations. My daughter told the nurse at Mercy that she wanted to kill herself and when the nurse asked why she said because my mom puts me on punishment. So now I guess the nurse felt like that was a crazy thing for a child to say. I guess the nurse felt like something was going on at home. Now if DCFS would have came into my home they would’ve looked over to the right of us and seen the punishment wall. Mommy doesn’t use those practices. I’m more like a “My Wife and Kids” type of parent. So here if you clean the bathroom, kitchen, your bedroom you get paid right. But if you get on punishment you gotta pay me and that’s 25 cents. If you get on parole or probation you have to pay them, in real life its not as simple as a punishment, you got to pay. So those are the practices that I use with my kids, I’m a petty mom but I’m petty in a good way, you know. This is a way of teaching them lessons because I don’t believe in abusing kids, I don’t believe in hitting kids. Being raised how I was raised I’m definitely not into the physical punishment thing. But just like the police, DCFS has a quota, they have to take away so many kids per month in order to keep their numbers a certain way. I believe its court rooms A through N and in each court room you have 3 to 5, 7 families fighting for their kids a day. So you mean to tell me there’s, lets round it off to 50, there’s 50 bad sets of parents a day? I think someone needs to look at those numbers because, you know, nowadays being a bad parent is having 3 children and you live in a 1 bedroom house. Being a bad parent nowadays is, lets say DCFS shows up to your home December 6th and your link card doesn’t come on till December 7th, never-mind that you cooked dinner that day. If you have nothing in your fridge or nothing in your cabinet, then guess what, that’s considered being a bad parent. If you’re going through any domestic issues you’re considered a bad parent. DCFS has another clause where if you have a physically disabled child and a mentally disabled child, like in my case, you’re not supposed to have these two kids in the same house. The most interesting thing that the DCP Investigator, Tiara Long told me when I asked her why she took her kids from me was, “Look at the environment you live in; they don’t need to be there….”

QM: This environment???

AN: This environment here, the projects, the Dearborn Homes, the low-income community, the school that they went to. That’s what she told me, they don’t need to be here. Who are you to tell me where they need to be, who are you to judge where I live at? Or the community that I live in? This is a complex that’s filled with DCFS children. If living in subsidized housing was such a bad thing then how come you guys actually give foster parents subsidized housing. I know of people who, back in the day, used that to get subsidized housing because they were foster parents and they had kids so they could apply for it through a DCFS program.

QM: So how long have they been away?

AN: They been away for 7 long month, 7 months. When this first happened to me I was in shock because I had my children early. I had Jada when I was 16 then I turned right around and had Raphael. Then I waited a little bit more to have Vernay. I had my first two real early, and I suffered a lot of things, I went through domestic relationships, through homelessness because no one wants to deal with a young girl and her two kids, right? Don’t nobody really want me in their household. When you’re young and don’t have a job, what are you supposed to do. You have to choose between going to school and going to work some times. So I feel like, ya’ll didn’t come when I was 16, 17, 18, 19; why the hell would ya’ll wait till I was 28, 29 years old to come take my kids from me? It don’t make any sense to me. And I’m thinking to myself, like what did I do to to deserve this then I thought about it, it had to be me because most mothers don’t speak up about stuff like this. They tell you that you have rights as a parent but I can’t go up to the school because they’ll think I’m trying to steal my kids back and I’m going to jail. I’m not allowed to go to a parent report card pick up. I’m not allowed to see them when I wanna see them. I’m not allowed visits, I’m not allowed for them to be here over night. I’m not allowed any of these things and there are other parents that this happens to as well. Then DCFS takes it a step further and puts you on child support, cuz you know, they can put you on child support. They can put moms on child support-

QM: Whaaaa?!?!

AN: They can put moms on child support. You will still to pay for children, of course they’re your children, that you don’t see. So how do you think that feels as a parent?? How does that feel as a parent? I know me, I cook for my kids, I clean for my kids, go to work for my kids. I come home and turn the key its usually one of my kids running to the front door saying, “Mommy you’re home!” I don’t get that anymore, and its a lot of parents that aren’t getting that anymore. Do I feel like DCFS is an institution that does need to be here, yeah, but I feel like its deeper than that. I feel like you guys need to go ahead and do full investigations. Are there kids out here who are getting abused? Yeah. But one thing I learned about traumatized kids is that they won’t talk because they’re scared for their life. A lot of times when children aren’t being abused there isn’t an investigation.

QM: So what has your lawyer said?

AN: Well, I had a public defender because I really felt like I didn’t do anything, there were no marks, there were no-

QM: Like this should be an easy one….

AN: This should be an easy one, I didn’t know that I was really fighting an institution that wanted to take my kids.

QM: So what did the public defender say?

AN: The public defender was horrible, she basically didn’t put in any motions. I didn’t know until bout the end of my case that they were supposed to come inspect my home. Also I was supposed to have supervised visits but the visits were supervised by the transporter, the man that transports the kids back and forth. These supervised visits are supposed to be by Melva Waters, that’s the name of my caseworker. She never came to none of my visits, neither her or a case aid to document my visits. That’s something the case workers are supposed to do, see there’s stuff that they’re supposed to do and as parents we do have rights. We have rights to ask for another case worker, we have rights to ask for another transporter. We have rights, but you won’t know that because nobody’s going to tell you that. They’re supposed to C-RAP your home, they’re supposed to come to these visits. They never came, no visit to see how the mom and the children are interacting with each other so you can reunite them. The crazy part about this is that I have pictures of this man selling drugs and they still handed them over to their dad. My son sat there in the courtroom and said that he was going to stand right here with me until they say I have to go. For the integrated assessment, my kids and I had to relive the trauma of their dad getting drunk and abusing us. We told them everything and they still placed my children with this man. So where is the justice in that when you place my kids with an abuser?

The interview continues on and on as she tells me that in order to even have a chance of winning her kids back is by hiring a lawyer. Seems simple right? The only thing is a retainer for a lawyer for this type of case is $10,000 and that’s low. The story gets even deeper as she details the sad story of Devonte Hart, a young man who was taken into foster care, abused and ultimately murdered by his adoptive parents. Once his mother got clean she tried to get him back but the family had moved and changed his last name. This is a prime example of how kids can wind up being lost in the system.

A couple of weeks ago I posted a status on Facebook which alluded to Child Protective Services/Department of Child and Family Services taking custody of children without sufficient evidence. What I expected was some type of support or different ways to be of assistance. Instead, what I got was a lot of educated black defending these institutions. Most were saying that the DCFS only gets involved when absolutely necessary and wouldn’t separate a child from a household for no reason.

I honestly feel as if that were the case then these statistics would look a bit different:31265393_10156138845486827_5965952196846551040_o

Look closely at these numbers, more specifically the “Alleged Reports” versus the “Unfounded Reports”, nearly 50% of the “Alleged Reports” were “Unfounded”. Now the definition of “Unfounded” can mean one of two things; the first is that there is abuse going on but not enough evidence to substantiate foul play the second is that some one brought up false allegations, either intentionally or unintentionally. That’s 46.4% of cases in Cook County that lack substantial evidence. That’s 15,902 cases in 2017 that have been  determined to be “Unfounded”. And that’s 15,902 children, most likely more, who have to go through the system and be labeled.

Now let’s say, hypothetically speaking, that half of those cases warranted an investigation and the other half didn’t. That’s still more than 7,951 children who have been displaced, relocated and transferred schools.

7, 951 children who just may miss their parents…

 

 

 

 

 

 

GAC Endorses Tio Hardiman for Governor of Illinois

A couple of weeks ago I posted on my Facebook page which stated, “What questions do the people have for the next Governor of Illinois?” I received various responses, people were wondering what his views were on the “Fight for 15” movement as well as the would-be Governor perspective on unions. So I reached out to Tio Hardiman an activist and adjunct professor who did a lot of ground work with CeaseFire. In 2004 he founded “Violence Interrupters”, which is a program that utilizes ex-gang members and returning citizens to intercept street violence before it happens. According to one PBS Frontline article on CeaseFire,

“In 2008, the Justice Department hired independent researchers to evaluate CeaseFire’s work. The researchers found a 17 to 24 percent decline in actual and attempted shootings at four of the seven sites they surveyed. “I found the statistical results to be as strong as you could hope for,” said the study’s lead author Dr. Wesley G. Sokgan, a political science professor at Northwestern University.”

Now imagine if we had the adequate resources from the state to efficiently duplicate this program in the most violent areas in Chicago. It would definitely be a beautiful thing and a game changer in terms of how we interact with each other on a daily basis. Take a glance at some of the policies he plans and get an insight on the candidate below. And here’s an in-depth study on just how CeaseFire along with Violence Interrupters is: http://cureviolence.org/partners/us-partners/illinois-partners/

tioh


QM: Give us your story on where you’re from, how you got started with CeaseFire and expound on the role of Violence Interrupters.

Tio Hardiman: “Well my name is Tio Hardiman, I’m running for Governor in the State of Illinois and my running mate is Patricia Avery. My background consists of a Masters Degree in Inner City Studies and I’m the former director of CeaseFire Illinois. I’ve sat on various boards throughout the state of Illinois dealing with the public defenders board and federal defenders. I’ve done a lot of work to change some of the conditions in the Illinois Department of Corrections and make the conditions more humane for inmates. I’ve done a lot of work in the field of criminal justice reform and reducing gun violence. I’ve stood up for women’s rights, I’e helped rescue 12 young women from a prostitution ring some years ago. Along with that I’ve intervened and mediated conflicts with thousands of young men and women in the city of Chicago. The list goes on and on, I’m a father a family man doing everything I can do to make things right across the board for everybody. I have about a 25 year history in leadership positions and I’m currently serving as an adjunct professor at Governors State and North Park University. Not only that I’m the President of a non for profit organization called Violence Interrupters, that’s what I’m doing right now and that’s my history at a glance.”

QM: Exactly how did you get started with CeaseFire as far as you activism is concerned?

Tio Hardiman: “I’ve always been a community activist but now I look at myself as more of a seasoned community leader. I grew up in the Avalon Park community on the southside and the Henry Horner projects on the westside. So at an early age I looked up to people that were involved in community activism. People I never really met but I studied the Black Panther Party. I studied their motto and how they stood up against police brutality and excessive force. I wish I would’ve met Huey P. Newton but I was too young at the time, they were much older than I am and those were a group of people I looked up to for some reason. Fred Hampton, you got Bobby Seale, Malcolm X I read all of his books while I was growing up. My uncles introduced me to black leadership and that’s what happened. It just became a second nature for me and I was always interested in standing up for the under dog. I grew up around some pretty tough circumstances, I grew up in the heart of the ghetto. I’ve seen drug addiction up close and personal, I’ve seen violence up close and personal. I’ve seen people go through a lot of changes and started to take a look to see what I could do to help change some of the conditions of all people. I got involved with CeaseFire back in 1999 when we only had about 4 staff back then, and we helped build that program to the highest level ever. I became a household name known as Mr. CeaseFire, people still look at me as Mr. CeaseFire today. I created the Violence Interrupters in 2004 and it became a sensation, so to speak. There was a documentary filmed called “The Interrupters” that kind of went viral and it was on PBS. Basically I can put my hands on several hundred young men that I helped turn their lives around personally. A lot of them are still doing real good , they’ve re-enrolled in school they’re obtaining degrees and living their lives.”

QM: What are your priorities?

Tio Hardiman: “Our priorities are for the state we have a 2020 Plan which represents a Perfect vision to Move the State of Illinois forward. Our plan includes supporting Veterans senior citizens college students People with disabilities women’s rights Children Returning citizens. As well as doing everything we can to open mental health clinics throughout the State of Illinois and reduce unemployment overall. This is the thing unemployment In the African American community Throughout the State of Illinois is 14.2%. The highest in the nation for African American people. Is 43% for African Americans males between the ages of 20 through 24, we have to reduce those numbers. Now unemployment state wide is Around 5%. But no community has been hit as hard as the black community. We have 1.7 million people living in poverty 30% of those people are African American And the list goes on and on. I’m running for governor to support the farmers also. I support the $15 minimum wage increase because people need to have a living wage. People actually need more than $15 but that’s fair just to get started. Another one of our goals is to reduce gun violence by 50% in the State of Illinois. I have a non traditional approach to working with gun violence. I will work with the ATF in state police to intercept Illegal gun trafficking. On the other side I plan on Creating more job opportunities through apprenticeship programs. I plan on hitting the streets myself, And you will never hear another governor say this. I will train and appoint a violence prevention czar that works with me to go out and reduce the shootings and killings In the streets of Chicago East Saint Louis and Peoria Decatur all over the place. I plan to bring all these young men to the table and roll our sleeves up and go to work in order to really put an end to this epidemic known as gun violence that continues to take the lives of so many young men and women.”

QM: What do you say to people who feel like the fight for 15 movement is a joke?

Tio Hardiman: “I can see people seeing why they think that the Fight for 15 movement is a joke based on a couple of reasons. One is that a lot of politicians are going to say they are all for a $15 an hour minimum wage increase but this is the problem. Yes its good to say that, I believe that and I would I would like see that happen, as soon as that bill hits my desk I’ll sign it to make it a reality in State of Illinois. But small businesses will suffer so we have to make sure that we provide small businesses with subsidies and incentives so that they could stay in business even though once we raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour. Now corporations like McDonald’s, of course they can pay $15 an hour and some of these CEOs are making $3500 an hour, so why step on the poor and working class people. So it’s not a joke it’s just going take the will of the people to make it a reality, we don’t have enough people fighting for that $15 minimum wage even though it appears to have a lot of support it’s obvious we need more support. As far as the people that think it’s a joke they need to just stop thinking that way because it can become a reality in Illinois.”

QM: Why do you want to run for Governor?

Tio Hardiman: “Well my name is Tio Hardiman, we say this in my campaign and the T-I-O stands for “Turn It Over”. I want to turn the state over to the people and the people never had the state. We have a governor now, Bruce Rauner who, during a Black History Month event, drank some chocolate milk to show that he supports diversity. I’m getting tired of this mess, I’m running for Governor to combat discrimination. We got racism going on, mass incarceration we have a mass Exodus of people moving from Illinois and Chicago. These billionaires continue to drown out the voices of the working class and poor people and we have to bring an end to this type of nonsense. It’s timeout for these billionaire tactics and strategies that they’re using, they’re dividing the black vote and dropping off money bags in the communities. They’re taking pictures of random black babies and when you look at their websites its black people all over the place, but our conditions have not changed. The thing is you have a few select preachers, these sell-out preachers in Chicago, not all preachers just a few of them. They’re having these backroom deals with these people running for Governor and some of these elected officials are doing the same thing because its about money, money, money. The love of money. We have to turn this type of narrative around and bring it back to the people. Instead of individual gain I’m running to show the state that we have a leader that believes in collective gain. See everybody is going to have a seat at the table and an opportunity for success with Patricia Avery and Tio Hardiman.”

QM: What’s your take on legalizing and decriminalizing cannabis?

Tio Hardiman: “I’m a proponent and a supporter of legalizing and decriminalizing small amounts of recreational usage of marijuana, for the tax money and to commute sentences where people were a locked up to for marijuana related crimes.  They shouldn’t be locked up anyway, this is a non violent crime. They’ve legalized marijuana in Colorado and they had a surplus, a 6.2 billion  surplus in the state of Colorado. Not just because of the marijuana but they’ve been making a lot of tax money which is a good thing for the state. I’d like to lead the state Illinois to a surplus sooner than later to write but it is not gonna happen because these billionaires create this catastrophic type of atmosphere in a state. Everything is falling down so they can set themselves apart and prop themselves up as a savior. But yes, I as governor would commutes sentences and legalize small amounts of recreational use of marijuana. But there’s a flip side to it we have to be honest as men and women and leaders. I don’t wanna see a lot of young people thinking its OK to smoke marijuana, because what happens then, some people not all people, graduate from marijuana and they end up using other drugs. Tobacco, alcohol and marijuana could serve as gateways to higher levels of drug usage.  And I don’t want anybody struggling with that type of stuff. A lot in teenagers and highschool students  look up to me and I’ll never tell them it’s OK to smoke marijuana. Now if you’re an adult, you wanna smoke, thats your business model have as a leader-“

QM: So are you saying that there should be age limits, some type of restrictions?

Tio Hardiman: “There should be age limits and some restrictions because I’ve seen the ugly side of addiction, in my community where I grew up at.”

QM: Whats your take on unions in general?

Tio Hardiman: “I support unions, I’m a former Union employee I have no issue with the unions, but the unions should be backing me. I don’t believe Illinois should be a right to work state because the unions I have a lot of power and unions do protect employees, for the most.  Unions protect employees but you have to understand the model of unions the model comes from the mafia days, the mobster days. They were controlling its stockyards controlling industries but I think that the unions are more sophisticated. Some of these employers would like to fire you without giving you any benefits. Especially if you’re on a leave of absence for medical conditions, you just might have to take a break and you need to be protected. How can an employee work somewhere for a company 10 to 15 years and you’re only seen as a number. That’s not good, you’re a human being and these employees especially if they’re making a lot of money. If they can show where they’re making millions and billions of dollars then take care of the employees. That’s where I stand with unions.”

QM: What are your plans to assist with community development for inner city entrepreneurs?

Tio Hardiman: “Well when it comes down to community development for inner city entrepreneurs, I’m all over that issue. My running mate, she used to oversee a budget of 80 million dollars in central Illinois where she would provide start up monies for the small businesses  throughout central Illinois. So that’s one of our main properties, to help promote small business opportunities here in the State of Illinois for everybody. The way we do it is by pushing the financial transaction tax, the LaSalle Street Tax, which is projected to bring in 3 billion dollars that’s projected OK. Let’s say it brings in 1.5 billion dollars that’s enough revenue, new revenue, that we can use to help boost the economy in the state especially the small business arena help the inner city entrepreneurs.”

QM: How do you play alone protecting our sanctuary city?

Tio Hardiman: “As governor of the head of this state, the executive in charge, I don’t agree with that and policies that a Donald Trump administration’s is trying to push forth. No human being should be seen as a legal anyway but I say this every time that question is asked of me. I support DACA, if you were raised in the USA, raised in Illinois I plan to make sure you stay. But we have to be clear about this and I bring up my ancestors when I talk about this. My ancestors came over on the bottom slave ships, we’re not immigrants here, people need to know that across the world. I’m going to say it time and time again because I traced my roots all the way to a slave plantation in Louisiana. I’ve traced my roots so it really hits home with me when we talk about a describing and defining people as immigrants anyway. Now we need to work on a pathway to citizenship for people and that’s the best we can do right now. But I plan to make sure that Illinois is a sanctuary state. However, I wish people would come over here the proper way therefore you don’t have to go back-and-forth on all these issues. But the truth of the matter is that 90% of the people that live in the United States came in from a distant land, except my people were not immigrants and were forced over here. I don’t play the game when it comes to that question there but I do support a human being’s right to be safe in a sanctuary state.”

QM: How do you plan on bridging the gap between the north and south side in regards to economic development?

Tio Hardiman: “Its just a matter looking at the different models that exists when you look at thriving communities. What’s the difference between the north and south side? There are more resources being poured into the north side because of the a leadership, because the aldermen, the Congressmen, the state reps and state senators. They’re going to make sure they take take care of the a north side. On the south side that we have a lack of development and it appears that some of our elected officials are not doing everything in their power to make sure that we have this economic boost. I would have to take a look at the whole landscape was going on on the South side and develop and design a plan to help move forward with strong economic development. I was on 79th street yesterday and I was live on social media. I started from 79th street all the way to 79th and Yates. I counted 100 maybe 120 abandoned buildings and abandoned store fronts. That story has to change because you ask people grow up and do good in these communities and they don’t have nothing to look forward to. There’s an old Sears off 79th and Kenwood that should be changed into a Target or Walmart some type of big chain store so we can hire the people in the community. Another thing I thought about, Amazon’s trying to move their number 2 headquarters to Illinois. Why not move it to the south side of Chicago, East Saint Louis or Peoria where people need the help? Why not move it to the west side of Chicago? So I’m real strong on economic development, especially on the south side. The north side they will be OK they have quite a few resources but anything I can do to help them as well I’m interested in.”

GAC Endorses Willie Preston for 31st District Representative

The phrase “out with the old, in with the new” is a saying that we all have heard before and it usually relates to New Years Eve resolutions, making progress and bettering ones life. Even though New Years has long past this analogy applies to the race for the 31st District Representative. The 31st District encompasses portions of Chicago’s Englewood, West Englewood neighborhoods, Oak Lawn, Chicago Ridge, Palos Hills, and other nearby communities.

I had a chance to catch up with Willie Preston, an organizer out of Englewood who has a passion for the people and is running against the incumbent. He’s very much in favor of a progressive income tax and understands the importance of having a STEM focused curriculum for our children. He’s just a regular family man that wants to see change in his community and has stepped up to the plate to do so.

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Candidate for 31st District State Rep Willie Preston and family (above)

QM: As 31st District State Representative what do you plan on doing differently in comparison to the incumbent?

WP: “Many things, my plan, unlike my opponent, I have a plan and it calls for bringing our back trade schools to Chicago. Everybody is not coming to college when I go down to Springfield I’m going to be down there fighting for vocational training inside our schools. We’re talking about plumbers, electricians, boiler makers, truck drivers. And this has to be done at the state legislature and that’s what we’re going down to Springfield to do. When my kids graduate high-school, south side of Chicago, I don’t want them lost or having to go to college and take out debt just to make a decent living. I want them to graduate with their diplomas in one hand and their union card in the other, if they decide their not going to college and that’s OK with us. My mother-in-law is a carpenter, she makes $100,000 annually, every year $100,000. She can raise a family, that’s head of household income, you can have you a home, a new car, your children can go to school, a good school that you can afford. You definitely won’t have to go to anybody’s aid office looking for food stamps. That’s the type of life changing politics that’s what this campaign is based on, we’re doing this to save people’s lives and change people’s lives. That’s one thing on the economic side, as far a property taxes go we plan on banning Mike Madigan and other law makers who practice property tax appeal law.”

QM: What is that exactly, property tax appeal law?

Preston: “So, when you get your property tax bill in the mail, lets say its $900. You think that’s too high for your little house so you go and say, “Hey, this is too high!” You need to hire an attorney because you don’t know the property tax law, property tax code, so you go and hire an attorney to get your property tax reduced. Mike Madigan, coincidentally, or not coincidentally who is one of the most powerful lawmakers in Illinois has the number one firm in Illinois. That’s not by coincidence so what we have is a situation that I have here is a situation where-“

QM: So you’re saying that he’s controlling what the law is-

Preston: “That’s right, he’s controlling it to make sure that he personally benefits and gets rich from it, and he does do it. Then what he does is re-funnel that money back into politics and make sure that he gets to come into the black community, Latino community and chooses who he wants to represent that community.

My campaign represents a stark contrast from that, he wont get to choose the leader over here anymore. We win this election we send a strong message that this community is an independent community and we’re going to choose our own leaders.

So right now we have two buildings that have been recently sold downtown. What we knew as the Sears Tower is now called the Willis Tower at 1 N. Clark, they got $50 million in property tax reduction. So the government doesn’t need $50 million laying around. We give somebody a reduction we increase some where else. So where’s the increase coming from? Its coming right here from my people, my people have a extra $200, $300, $500, $700 increase in their property tax, regular working class folk while rich folk downtown are getting under-assessed we’re getting ours over-assessed. There needs to be a property tax frieze or a serious reduction in property tax. And that’s what also is driving up the rent of people who are just getting started. 1500 dollars for a 1, 2 bedroom apartment? We’re gonna end that and how we’re going to stop it is by having people like me down there at Springfield that will say no, and fighting against that and winning.”

QM: In one interview you say, “Springfield politicians largely just go along to get along, and that’s what I’m seeing in my district right now and I want to work to change it.” What exactly do you see that needs to be changed that hasn’t in the past 30 years?

Preston: “Well a lot of things, but one thing I can site is this. We have somebody that’s been in office for nearly 50 years, Mike Madigan, he’s the Speaker of the House. Every last Democrat votes for him in the House, every last Democrat in Springfield votes for him to be Speaker of the House, “go along to get along”. That is so much centralization of power it’s unnatural, it’s un-American. We don’t have kingdoms, or supposedly we’re not supposed to be about that, this is supposed to be about democracy. And one thing I’m going to do is not vote for him as Speaker of the House that will be a stark difference. Throughout the years as Chicago and Illinois have gotten blacker and browner, the state funding to our education system has gotten lesser and lesser. We have more black politicians that most people inside this nation in terms of our state government, and they went along with that. That’s why today Illinois is last in state funding for public education. Last in America in the funding percentage allocated to public education. I got family in Mississippi, like most of us do down south, we used to laugh at them and call them country. But you know what, they’re ahead of us, they have a state government, a supposedly racist state government in Mississippi and they are racist. But they invest more in their education than we do. We’re going to end that, in Springfield that’s what Mike Madigan and other lawmakers who prioritize our state budget that went along with it. I was a victim of it, if you were a student of CPS you were a victim of it. Other people were surpassing us but we didn’t know it because we were children and they were getting invested in more than us. And so look around at 28, 29, 30, 33 years old they are executives, they’re in media, they’re in government. They’re in a host of things and enjoying the spoils of a global economy, we’re not because we were not trained, we were not invested in. Its nothing wrong with us, it was something wrong with those state  politicians who allowed it happen and I’m taking one of them out with the help of people from the movement.”

QM: So being more specific are you saying that in regards to CPS’ education or Illinois in its entirety?

Preston: “Illinois in general. CPS is obviously where the most black and brown children, more specifically black from a historical context. That is where the large share of black and brown children attend school in Illinois, which is CPS and we have been underfunded for decades, the last in America. We have to get billions more dollars in order to treat these kids fair so they can be ready for this global economy they’re going to inherit.”

QM: Whats your take on CPS as an entity and what do you plan on implementing to reverse the school-to-prison pipeline?

Preston: “Well one of the things that’s extremely important, something I’ve been working on prior to running for office, is focusing on de-centralizing power. What do I mean by that? Right now one person gets to appoint the entire school board, that’s the mayor of Chicago.  That is why we find corruption because its a billion dollar budget that these folks have with contracts galore. One person should not be appointing all these people, they have to be accountable to the people who vote for them as well as the taxpayers. The way that we do that is by making certain that we have an elected school board. We have to force these people to run in elections and I think if we do that it would have to happen again at the state level. At the state level if we run a bill and make sure that it happens now, an elected school board, we’re going to have elections. In fact many other school boards districts, except for CPS, does it so we’re going in that direction. By the way, my opponent, in the 90s voted to make this law by having the Mayor of Chicago appoint the entire school board.”

QM: Regarding education, what is going to be your main focus?

Preston: “Science. Technology. Engineering. And mathematics. We all know what the recipe for the future success is going to be, we all know. But it takes billions of dollars, school should look radically different from when I was in school. In fact schools should look radically different from when my grandmother was there, but they don’t. My grandmother went to Gillespie and if she walks into a school on the south side of Chicago it’ll look identical to when she was a child. And that is a serious problem. So we need billions more dollars-“

QM: That means the architecture is old, and perhaps unsafe-

Preston: “Yes, the architecture is old, the technology is old, we’re very clear on that. When we think about lead and all these other things we have to consider the lack of investment we’ve made into our capital funding inside of our buildings, including our schools. To your question with schools, we need billions more dollars to invest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Making certain that these are at the core of what our children are learning. So that when they’re eighteen they’re not wondering, “What am I going to do now?” No, they’re going to school to actually prepare them for a career inside the industries that are going to be dominating the economy over the next decades. So, how do we get there? We need a progressive income tax, which I support. We need to be able to fund our schools not based on the property tax, that is regressive, it never has worked and its failed folks in our generation. Lets say J. B. Pritzker is worth seven billion dollars lets say I’m worth seven thousand dollars. We’re paying the exact same income tax, that’s a problem. For me, this is not a new idea however we have Republican states surrounding us such as Wisconsin and Indiana who back this. As you make more and more in your income, you just pay a higher rate, its that simple. And if we do that, this progressive income tax, and scale up the tax revenue we’ll generate from this will be billions of dollars. Enough money to be able to pay for the schools that I just envisioned. Imagine when we walk in schools and they were technologically relevant. Imagine if we walked into a school and instead of a green chalkboard, that my mother and grandmother were writing on, there were interactive white boards. Where children can interact with professionals who have different occupations such as farming, folks inside business, etc. We need to make certain we’re giving our children the opportunity to thrive and be successful. This is what the progressive income tax will help us pay for. I’m calling all people from the movement to get involved right now because this is a serious campaign. This is the campaign for those of us that’s in the movement. This is the campaign that we should target, we should take out an old incumbent who’s been there for thirty three years unopposed and put in one of our own. Lets actually get some results for our people. We haven’t seen anything out of this government but just a handful of people we don’t know. We don’t know them because we’re too busy trying to survive but there are people who are receiving billions upon billions of state money. No one knows them or interacts with them or are benefiting from them. Its time for us to go in a different direction, we need a #NewBreedofLeadership that’s thinking totally different from that. One that understands government, appreciates its history and also has a vision for the future as to what things can be. Imagine what it would be like if we had 14% of the states procurement budget. And I say we meaning black firms, you’re talking billions and billions of dollars. Its not a hard lift either, 14% going to black firms in our community. The thing for me is that we’re going to go down to Springfield and fight for 14% procurement for black firms. That is a win for everybody, that’s a win for black business owners who will create jobs within the community. Especially the ones who have nothing to do who are standing on the corner and this will prevent them from either going to jail or winding up in a casket. We’re going to offer something different for this community, we’re going to offer something different for the south side of Chicago. I’m not interested in giving individuals with power more power, these same folks and old contracts that have been used again and again. We need to get new contracts for new entrepreneurs. If we lean in as much as we possibly can up until the 20th they won’t have a choice but to see some black power politics coming out of the south side. We’re going to make it happen.”

#StrengthInNumbers Podcast Episode 2 Meet: @DrePeriod.

On this weeks show I got a chance to catch up with Dre, Period. a North side MC who attends Chicago State University. We talked about his new EP dropping 1.27.18 entitled “That’s That. Peace.”, what influenced him to make it, how the #SaveCSU movement affected his music and how sex dolls may eventually take over the world.

Check it out below, please comment and share!!

“That’s That. Peace.”

Peace…

Wrongful Raids (Part 1)

Imagine that you’re at home with family on a Friday night. You go to the bathroom and all of the sudden your mother screaming from the front room. You hear loud crashes and she’s screaming out that “They’re comin in!” Who the “they” is could be anybody’s guess especially when you’re living over east where its most definitely hectic. This is exactly what Shanae Cross was thinking as she was attempting to snatch her mother in the bathroom to protect her from apparent yet unidentified danger. To her surprise it turns out its the good old Chicago PD, guns drawn, yelling out orders, coercing a young lady and her family to line up against a wall and they hadn’t even explained why they were there in the first place. Lets not mention the fact that during this her mother began to have “panic attack” or “seize”. According to Ms. Cross her mother was “shaking uncontrollably” and that this is the “first time” she’s seen her mother behave in that manner. The Tactical Unit of Division 10 also tried to arrest her little brother who’s only 17 until Shanae asserted herself and demanded to see the warrant.

It turns out that they were attempting to serve a no-knock warrant but got the wrong address, despite the fact that Shanae’s address number was completely visible. In the United States, a no-knock warrant is a warrant issued by a judge that allows law enforcement officers to enter a property without immediate prior notification of the residents, such as by knocking or ringing a doorbell. When the officers realized that they in fact did kick down the wrong door they said, “Well this happens sometimes….” and proceeded to exit the house without even offering an apology or explanation.

They found the right house down the street and immediately kicked it down, they were pretty adamant on getting that warrant served…

Shanae is heartbroken because she had a celebration planned for her grandmother who passed on the 22nd the previous year. There were plans with her family to have a memorial service in her honor but your plans will stop too when your door is kicked in at 12:45am.

I interviewed Shanae Saturday at 3:30pm and her door was still mangled, the police kicked it in on Friday at 12:45am. You do the math….

As I was starting my interview she heard a knock on the door, and it was none other than Fred Waller who’s the Chief of Patrol in Chicago. When Ms. Cross began to give her personal account of what had taken place it got to a point where he began interrupting her story saying, “He heard enough from Facebook” and “This only happens 10 times a year…..” This comes off as dismissive and insensitive but you be the judge.

Take a listen below:

#StrengthInNumbers Podcast Episode 1 Wrongful Raids (Part 1) w/ Shanae Cross

Part 2 will be dropping tomorrow, please keep Shanae in your prayers.

Put Some Flava In Ya Ears (2018)

In the midst of a deteriorating drill scene, White Gzus‘ new project Flava Godz, will give you a taste of what Chicago hip-hop felt like pre-Chief Keef, extremely laid-back and pimpish. @NotGzusPiece and @BlancoCaine haven’t even thought about slowing down as this is their fifth collaborative project together and the first tape of the Flava Godz series. The tape is executive produced by @Mr_E_Videos, yes THAT Mr. E., with the music DVDs. Best believe, when I found out he produced I was shocked but he’s similar to a Top Chef on the beats. He chops up samples from Monica and Weldon Irvine with ease giving the tape a laid back, Do Or Die feel that’s impossible to imitate.

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The tape has a couple of other features such as the legendary @TwistaGMG as well @BodiDeederCGE who’s been rockin with Cash Gang Ent. for a lil minute. Deeder is actually on a 3rd of the tape and his culinary expertise truly makes Flava Godz a full course meal, something you’ll probably catch the -itis from.

The tape is set to release by the first quarter of the new year so be sure to stay in tune by following them on Twitter and Insta. Check out their latest visual “Regina Jam” shot by @VACCIVISUALS below.

White Gzus – Regina Jam | Shot By @VACCIVISUALS