The Rise of an Empire: Cinco De Money 2

When we speak of legends, from the Hip Hop perspective, we must all agree that each city has its own acclaimed Hall of Fame. Well, because I’m from Chicago, allow me to expose you to one phenomenal emcee from our global city here in the Midwest region of the United States. This is going to be a bit unorthodox for you traditional suckas, but we’re going to give a big up to one of our own while he can still smell the flowers. I’m sure, after seeing the manifestation of his supporters, that he understands the love that the city has for him, but I believe it’s time to knock down the barriers on communication. Ty Money actually gave the recipe in one of the songs I’m about to review when he said, “we’ve been sleeping for 400 years straight; think it’s time to wake please…” So with that said, lets show Ty Money what we are going to take from his highly anticipated and demanded mixtape, Cinco De Money 2.

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Before we dive right into this piece, it’s important to understand the history behind this amazing artist. Ty Money actually represents Harvey World, but I personally don’t agree with the geographical divides that came into place because of the hyper-gentrification of Chicago’s public housing communities. Harvey, Illinois is a part of Chicago, and we definitely are going to finesse those boundaries to be able to claim this amazing brother as our own. This artist has most certainly earned his keep, and has labored to gain his position as one of the city’s most prospective and creatively explosive artists, period. Money and his brother I.D. joined together in 2005 to form the power rap group, Firesquad. Fast forward to Summer of 2015 when he dropped Cinco De Money vol. 1, where he brands his unique and particular sound that launches him into the platform of next guy up for the entire Midwest region. After spending time with Yassin Bey (Formerly known as Mos Def), and dropping the extremely conscious track United Center afterward, I was very curious to know whether Ty Money would spill some of the heightened black awareness into his music, and I must say that I am not dissatisfied; this album was monumental, and I believe it contains a healthy balance of the positive and negatives that come with being from the hood. Being a revolutionary writer, and an activist, I have a very low filter for fuck music, and I have a strong dislike for the content that makes up the Chicago Drill scene. I was happy to hear story lines, artistry, mixtures in creative content; all of the differences that made albums of the 90’s so classic.

            I decided to review 3 songs from his project, and instead of just adding fancy words to describe what I want you to believe the song is about, I’m going to break down exactly what he is saying, then put it into perspective so it can be used to understand the choices that are children are poised with on a daily basis. The first song, and be advised that this order bears not merit to my ordering on the quality of each song, is God got Us, which was produced by Y. F. Beatz. The second song that I’m going to review is What They Taught Me, which was produced by RioMac. Lastly, I’ll provide a review of How, which was also produced by RioMac.

In God Got Us, which features a deep hypnotic bass line, with a simple chord, and the artist compliments with calmly energetic rhyme scheme that befits what the intro to a mixtape is supposed to sound like. The lesson to be learned from this song is that we all need to do some individual prioritizing; in all this work towards perfection, we must never forget to keep faith, and also acknowledge God for bringing us through all of the trials and tribulations that we have encountered. Ty Money starts the song off by dropping the greatest jewel so far this year by saying, “Get some money, f*** the hype n****. Walk by faith, not by sight n****. Flexing around the wolves, that’s not right n****…” This brings us to the place where we begin to ask about the moral fabric of these deviant citizens, who live by street laws, as opposed to state mandated laws. The question being whether religion has a sufficient effect on curbing violence and plight in minority communities here in the United States, or whether a more effective institution of socialization is needed.

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Institutions of Socialization

Whether or not churches have the ability to curb violence in the community, it is apparent that these urban deviants do still hold sound beliefs in God, but reject the authority or persuasion of the church. Not to stray too far from the subject, but that is a reality in these communities that have been affected by violence, that is manifest derivative of economic and social disparity that is prevalent in minority communities. This brings us to the question of how we develop and diffuse the sets of morals that will bring about the behaviors that we hope to see in the future leaders of our people. With all of the violence that is associated with our youth, Money validates this generational attraction to mischief, and how experience and maturity help to curve these behaviors when he spits, “I den been to jail, came home, got shot, caught a cause, so now I do a lot of cooling…” The question that I propose after here this testimony is how do we encourage young minority men to see the benefits of developing habits that help to decrease the probability of them ending up in troublesome situations and dangerous environments.

Further expounding on the some of the moral sets that are popular in the urban music community here in Chicago, Ty Money captivates us with his single worthy track, What They Taught Me, which is spread evenly over a mellow and smoke ready melody. The key lesson behind this track is honor, and in the song, Ty exposes several of the key guidelines and laws that are stressed to young minority men in urban communities here in the U.S. In the hook he raps, “Get money, fuck b*****s, tote itchy, pour liquor, little n**** don’t back from no n****. That’s just what they taught me…” In this segment of the track, we can identify urban hustle in his reference to getting money, which establishes urban hustling as an important trait in minority communities.

Black Men Fighting For Honor

He also references the trait of honor, by proclaiming that he wouldn’t back down from anyone, regardless of who they were. This isn’t an isolated characteristic, and might provide a glimpse into misconceptions with our youth around the definition of honor; a misconception that may contribute to situations that account for a portion of our city’s high crime rate. And like many Hip Hop songs in circulation, there are references to sex and alcohol, tools that urban deviants use to numb the stress caused by social factors associated with poverty stricken communities. This is a testament to the desensitization of sex by promiscuous sexual saturation on mainstream media outlets, especially including the music and film industries. Unlike critics of the promiscuous nature of the music industry, I do not place sole blame for this desensitization of sex on these male entertainers, but I blame institutions of socialization, and also the women who, without their participation, could make the fad of casual sex disappear.

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Money also takes this song into a deeper community analysis when he expounds his verse on the perspectives of simple-minded individuals made smoking, eating and having sex a priority. He also expounds on his skepticism and distrust, that was taught to him by his mother (nurture-socialization), that serves as a defense mechanism or mechanism of survival for these underserved minority citizens. Things me to an experience of my own, where I went to Seattle, and experienced culture shock. It wasn’t a situation where I was thrown into a pack of wolves and torn apart. On the contrary, I was brought from a place where distrust kept you alive, to a place where every said hi and openly solicited their friendship. This was a great observation presented by Ty, but even more impressive was his take on the advice given by leaders and elders from his community. In this story, he tells of the advice by elders to not live life so fast and loud, and that by staying discrete about his ventures, he would set himself for more long-term successes. In this line, he also exposes a latent benefit to living a more discrete lifestyle; making himself less of a target for predators in the community. According to Money, they also instilled in him the requirement to assess the productivity of individuals that he places in his network, because inefficient relationships become more of a liability then a benefit. Ok, we have established the depth of his perspectives on priorities and moral sets, but how critical is Ty on his own culture, from the perspective of objective introspection?

Well Accomplished  

Well, from my opinion, Ty Money did not just do this, but he did it in the boldest and most eloquent manner, by posing critical thought provoking questions for consumers to ponder on. The thesis for this song, as I perceive it is actually a statement prompting peers in his culture to objectively assess themselves. In this proposition, he exposes his perception that young minorities have become complacent, and have failed to set goals in the culture that promote long term success for the culture, as well as the entire race of people of African descent here in the United States. Money begins his proposal by asking, “How you at the mall, pocket full of swipes: baby out of wipes? Card cracker turned rapper; caught a fraud case, now you wanna write.” Can you see the profoundness of this questioning? Money has set the bar for critical thinking, and the application of logical thought when assessing one’s self in the pursuit of personal progress. He also questions the increasingly dominant trend of individuals seeking to capitalize in the music industry off of the credit of having criminal backgrounds and involvement.

PTSD

I personally see this trend as being a product of post traumatic slavery disorder, paired with the continuous neglect by African Americans to unify beyond imposed class divides, to address the effects caused by the instability of African American households; a direct derivative of the institutional plights that have been inflicted upon our race by white america. Most important to this subject, is the evident internalization of norms by African Americans; norms that were created by racist and imperialist white america. The fact that I have been able to dive so in depth into the content within this song, and I haven’t gone pass the first 4 bars in the song, is the reason why you must download this mixtape in the link provided below, and give this project (especially this song) a try! This song is really the manifestation of what I wanted to see from Ty Money after his time building with Yassin Bey; a song dedicated to the advance of the critical thought of young minorities in america. Go download that project now dammit. Geno signing off, but never offline; enjoy!

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Facebook Profile: https://www.facebook.com/tiwan.dirtybirds?fref=ts

Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Ty-Money-172494749451707/?fref=ts

Twitter Profile: https://twitter.com/TyMoneySBMG

Instagram Profile: https://www.instagram.com/tymoneysbmg/

SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/tiwan-tymoney-sbmg-dirtybirds

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/ty-money/id303280162

Google Play:
They Aint Doin Shyt (Remix) ft. Mac Mili – https://play.google.com/music/preview/Agnyqoxxotwtpormt63ourabvmi?u=0#

Reader Article: http://www.chicagoreader.com/chicago/ty-money-tiwan-raybon-cinco-mixtape-rap-hip-hop-harvey/Content?oid=21007766

Live Mixtapes:
Cinco De Money vol. 1: http://indy.livemixtapes.com/mixtapes/34051/ty-money-cinco-de-money.html
Cinco De Money vol. 2: http://indy.livemixtapes.com/mixtapes/39565/ty-money-cinco-de-money-2.html

Ty Money – Billboard.com – United Center: http://www.billboard.com/articles/columns/hip-hop/6777151/ty-money-laquan-mcdonald-murder-united-center-video

RioMac Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RioMacHSP?ref=br_rs

Y.F. Beats SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/yfbeats-1

 

 

Adobe Creative Cloud: Software-As-A-Service

pizza logo 1I created this sample piece while watching a tutorial in Adobe’s online learning environment. There were a few things that I did not do exactly as they showed, because I feel compelled to maintain my individual expression as an artist, but I am very proud of the work I have done.
While this is but a simple piece of art, and I was coached through creating it, I gave this project my 100% effort. Adobe’s products, fused with their online learning center, has captivated my interest so much so that I went out and purchased a stylus pad and pen to be able to create on a more professional and creative level.
All I can say is that you all have developed an amazing marketing strategy for a fairly new product (Software as a Service) in the market. Because you all have presented a product, and supplied training (cutting back on administrative cost associated with training or hiring qualified candidates), I am able to economically enter your purchase funnel, and still capitalize off the skills acquired.
GREAT JOB ADOBE! www.adobe.com/creativecloud.html
adobe logo
Eugene Stanley
Director of Communications
Chicago Anti-Eviction Campaign
info@globalafricachicago.org

With 209 People Shot and 34 Killed in Chicago So Far This Year, Protestors Who Shut Down “Mag Mile” Seek to Shut Down Violence in Black Community

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Today, the same organizations that joined together to put launch the 2015 Black Friday protest on Chicago’s infamous “Mag Mile” held a demonstration to denounce police terror, as well as Black on Black violence. A brief press conference was held with “The Final Call”, then the freedom fighters traveled from 75th & Dorchester to 79th & Cottage Grove to raise awareness on the UN Conference to be held at Chicago State University on January 24th & 25th. The soldiers also took a firm stance against the ongoing plague of poverty induced violence that has led to 209 people being shot, and 34 of those victims dying from their sustained injuries, in just the first few weeks of the year. The current state of African’s in this country is sickening, but I can personally attest to the fact that immediate economic and social intervention is needed in Chicago. It is this truth that compels me to the front-line of this battle against an ancient and dying machine.

I left the south-side of Chicago for the first time when I went to the United States Navy. It was a huge culture shock for me. This was my first encounter with Europeans besides being victimized, profiled, and discriminated against by the police because my ancestors built pyramids, and lived on a resourced enriched land. When I stepped off the bus I was too shocked to focus on anybody’s behaviors besides my own, but when I was stationed aboard a Naval ship, I got to observe these people closer.

Up to this point, I had only read narratives, and brief descriptions about slavery; but my most accurate briefing came from watching tapes of the television show Roots, that aired in 1977. I wound up traveling through a season in my life in which I was heavily and constantly numbed by alcohol. I reached out to the Navy chaplain, and was receiving assistance. After getting into an alcohol related incident on base where I passed out and stopped breathing, I found myself standing in front of a group of white men in tan uniforms. There was one black man, but he didn’t do any talking; he just stared. For 10 minutes, these Naval chiefs attempted to tear pride and dignity from me through a form of verbal degradation only befitting for an animal. What they didn’t know was that my pride is in my heart, and that can never be taken; it can only be relinquished.

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It was this event, along with an overwhelmingly majority of my interactions with these people, that pushed me to make an informed decision not to trust them. I determined, through interaction with a few very great people that were European, that I couldn’t hate them, but I surely knew that I had to protect myself and my family from them by any means necessary. This is what compels me to speak and build rapport with the young African youth in my neighborhood. This is what made me go out to protest after being fired days before Christmas for telling a European at my workplace that I wouldn’t allow anyone from management to confiscate my phone, and what ultimately led me to assisting in this process of hosting this United Nations fact finding mission.

The United Nations has assigned a work group (Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent) to visit Chicago and take testimony on the Human Rights violations against people of African descent in the United States. The mission is to take testimony from civil society, and state and city representatives on the condition and plight of African Americans within the U.S. With the current climate of public disdain towards Chicago’s current Mayor Rahm Emmanuel, Governor Rauner, and the Chicago Police Department, this investigation into the human rights violations that taken place throughout this nation’s history stands to be a monumental milestone in the African fight for fairness within the United States.

The United Nations Conference will be held at the Chicago State University Library Auditorium. On Sunday, the events will take place between the times of 50 pm and 7 pm; the public is urged to arrive early, as seats are claimed on a first come first serve basis. This is a major accomplishment for people of African Descent around the world, and we highly encourage families to come as units, showing a strong engagement and interest in the futures of all of our youth.

Written By: Eugene ‘Geno’ Stanley

 

https://twitter.com/genodagreat
https://facebook.com/theonlygeno

Website:
http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/Racism/WGAfricanDescent/Pages/WGEPADIndex.aspx
http://chicagoantieviction.org/

http://nationalblackagendaconsortium.org/

http://www.blackstarproject.org/

Special Thanks:

  • Willie ‘JR’ Flemming – Chicago Anti Eviction Campaign
  • Iva Carruthers
  • Pat Hill
  • Vicki Casanova
  • Stan Willis-Groups
  • Human Rights Network
  • The Black Star Project
  • National Black Agenda Consortium
  • N’COBRA – Chicago
  • African Development Plan
  • F.L.Y. Fearless Leading by the Youth
  • Justice or Else (NOI – The Final Call)
  • Paleo-Americans First Inc. & Tepiu-aui-Ra
  • Midwest Black Law Student Association
  • Attorney Stan-Willis
  • Shakira Brown

 

United Nations Arriving in Chicago: Africans Charge Genocide-Encampment Project of Tents

Media Advisory – For Immediate Release                         Contact: Kham Howard

January 23, 2016                                                                   Phone: 773.520.0369

 

As U.N. Arrives in Chicago, Encampment Project of Tents Rises to Welcome Officials

And to Announce that “Africans Charge Genocide” in America

 

Encampment Project Will Be in Place during U.N. Visit

in Solidarity with Projects in All Cities Visited by United Nations

 

What:         With the United Nations fact-finding mission about 24 hours away, The Encampment Project is coming to Chicago, endorsed by the National Coalition of Blacks for Reparations in America (N’COBRA).  This campaign is an important step in the direction of the diplomatic encirclement of the U.S. in its genocidal treatment of African people.  Chicagoans of African descent will also testify before the U.N. on this genocidal treatment.

Who:          National Coalition of Blacks for Reparation in America endorses the International People’s Democratic Uhuru Movement’s (InPDUM) Encampment Project.  People of African descent and other organizations from around the country, and around the world, have been invited to set up tents.  

Why:          Almost everyone is aware of the string of murders of African people by the police. Walter Scott in South Carolina, Eric Garner in New York, Sandra Bland in Texas, Freddie Gray in Maryland, Laquan McDonald and Rekia Boyd in Illinois, Oscar Grant III in California, Mike Brown and Cary Ball in Missouri, 7 year old Aiyana Jones in Michigan, 12 year old Tamir Rice in Ohio, and just on Saturday, January 16, 2016, Palm Beach County Florida Sheriff’s deputies murdered a 19 year old African named Henry Thomas Bennett in Belle Glade, Florida.  KilledByPolice.net reports that 3,087 Americans were killed by the police between 2013 and 2015 (in 3 years), many being young Black men.  Tuskegee University’s Records and Research Division reports that 3,446 Negros were lynched between 1882 and 1968 (in 82 years) by the Ku Klux Klan.  Africans Charge Genocide!!!

 

Where:       Chicago State University

9500 South at St. Lawrence 

                    Chicago, Illinois

 

When:        Saturday, January 23, 2016 at 2:30 pm (Photo opportunities) 

 

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A Letter to the Women of Revolutionary Combat

 

Purpose:

To make a public apology, and inquire about how the populous of revolutionary women want to engage in combat.

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This letter is directed towards all of the women who served in revolutionary combat on December 19, 2015, in Chicago, Illinois. During the demonstration, there was a lot of emotion and energy in the atmosphere. During one point of the march, we citizens encountered our first standoff against the police state. During that time, it was clear that police had drawn a line in the sand, and for a moment, it appeared as if we were almost ready to cross that line by force and number. During that moment, my instinct told me to order the children and women to the rear ranks. I proceeded to do the same each time confrontation was a possibility.

After the demonstration of power, I agreed to go to the 18th precinct to await the release of the only person to be arrested by the Chicago Police Department (three people received citations). A friend that came with the arrestee approached Ja’Mal Green and I, and told us that his friend was arrested while no one was looking. Ja’Mal then called the precinct, and they confirmed that he was there. A lawyer was dispatched to the jail for him, and his friend and I left to see to the safe release of our comrade.

When we got there I met the most beautiful black queen in uniform. She was very kind and warm; she seemed much more like a friend’s mother than a police officer. A friend’s mother I’d flirt with, might I add. She kept us up to date with his processing, and we had a very funny conversation. During the almost two hour wait, the friend of the arrestee walked to a nearby restaurant to get us some fried jumbo shrimp. He hyped them up to be a bit more than they actually were, but they were good indeed. I was especially thrilled when she announced that he was being released. She was an amazing woman, but not amazing enough to make me want to kick the bobos in the precinct!

On the ride back home, I found myself engaged in conversation with my two brothers of the struggle. We spoke on a wide range of topics, but one stuck with me enough to make me write this blog. The arrested demonstrator brought up the calls for Black men to move to the front ranks of the group; the calls that I initiated. He said that some women might’ve taken that offensive. It might’ve been perceived as a minimization of the capabilities of women in revolutionary combat. He mentioned how women were on the frontlines, and actively engaged in battle in contemporary warfare. I pleaded my case until the moment where we positively agreed to disagree.

Black Queens Fight

I haven’t forgotten that conversation, and I finally mustered the courage to confront this topic. So, to the revolutionary woman, I apologize if I offended any of you. My intensions were to build a protective covering over all women and children. I personally have come to believe that men should be on the frontlines. I no longer want to make offensive statements, so revolutionary woman, what role do you want to play? Is it offensive to want to protect the vessels of human life?

***I’d like to try something different this time. I love the support that you all give me, and I love all of the support. If you found this blog informative and/or interesting, PLEASE LIKE, SHARE, and COMMENT!!!! Thank you so much, and be blessed. Signing off, but never offline!***